Love: Family, Friends, Tribe, and Nation

Hosts

Woe

aka Eschatologuy

Love and duty are matters of concentric circles — to the closer is the greater duty and the greater love owed. In the previous episode in this series, we covered the facets of self-sacrifice love (agape) and charity (caritas); in this episode, we cover familial and brotherly or fraternal love, emotional (amor) and intellectual (dilectio) love, and piety (the historical, proper sense) and paternal love — three pairs, as it were. We call these facets, because it is not that love can be dissected and broken down into constituent parts; rather, it is that love is expressed in different ways between different people at different times. The love a husband has for his wife is not the same as the love a man has for his nation.

If we are commanded to love, then we must certainly understand what it means to love. We must know whom (and what) we must love and what is the nature and scope of that love. The world would deceive us by calling that which is not — and often even that which cannot be — love ‘love’. As Christians, we are commanded to be wise, and love — to whom it is owed and how it must or must not be expressed — is assuredly a matter of wisdom.

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See Also

Further Reading

Parental Warnings

“Homosexual fornication” and “sodomy” are used as descriptors for an example around the 40:00 mark, but the matter is not discussed in detail or explicitly.

Transcript

The transcript for this episode can be found here

Other transcripts can be found here

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Love: Sacrifice and Charity

Hosts

Woe

aka Eschatologuy

Love is a multifaceted thing. Sometimes this complex nature can be masked in English by the use of the umbrella term “love” (or even by the exclusion of concepts that really fall under that umbrella — e.g., “friendship”). In this first episode in our (planned) three-episode series on love, we discuss agape (i.e., self-sacrificing or sacrificial love) and caritas (i.e., charity), their interrelationship, and some of their connections to other facets of love (e.g., storge [i.e., familial love]).

Love is a matter of who is doing the thing, whom is receiving the thing, and what the nature and scope of the thing is. The love — more accurately, the scope and nature of the love — you owe to your wife (agape, eros) is not the same as the love you owe to your siblings (agape, philia) or to your nation (pietas). Love is a matter of wisdom, one that has fallen into neglect in Christian discourse.

All that is called love is not.

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Show Notes

See Also

Further Reading

Parental Warnings

None.

Transcript

The transcript for this episode can be found here

Other transcripts can be found here

Comments?

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Perfect Hatred

Hosts

Woe

aka Eschatologuy

As Christians, we are required to affirm the whole counsel of God — and that particularly includes those parts that the modern world would prefer to ignore, or even to condemn. We are told that love is a matter of permissiveness and that Christians must not — cannot — hate. But is that what Scripture says about the matter?

The numbers certainly tell a different story. For Scripture certainly speaks of love:

  • αγαπη (‘love’) — 115, NT; 15, LXX
  • αγαπαω (‘to love’) — 143, NT; 213, LXX
  • αγαπησις (‘loving’) — 0, NT; 8, LXX
  • αγαπητος (‘beloved’) — 61, NT; 17, LXX

but it just as certainly speaks of hate:

  • μισεω (‘to hate’) — 40, NT; 143, LXX
  • μισος (‘hate’) — 0, NT; 11, LXX
  • μισητος (‘hateful, hated’) — 0, NT; 4 LXX
  • εχθρα (‘enmity’) — 6, NT; 15, LXX
  • εχθρος (‘hostile’) — 32, NT; 320, LXX

We dare not attempt to be more righteous than God, and we dare not call anything God does or commands wicked. “Woe to those who call evil good and good evil, who put darkness for light and light for darkness, who put bitter for sweet and sweet for bitter!” If God says to hate, then it is our duty to understand what we must hate, and (if possible) why.

He, who does not hate, does not love.

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Transcript

The transcript for this episode can be found here

Other transcripts can be found here

Comments?

Join the discussion on Telegram, visit the feedback form or comment below.